Monthly Archives: August 2014

The Winter is Gone – Kate Hurley

I first heard this song at the end of the Deadraisers movie that came out a while ago.  I immediately loved its simple style and poetic lyrics.  Not to mention Kate Hurley’s awesome voice.  Of course, I had to find the chords for it.  Although google knows everything, this one thing it couldn’t tell me, so I found Kate Hurley’s website and sent her a message asking for help.  She was kind enough to respond and sent me the chords you see below.  🙂

While the song isn’t yet on youtube, you can listen to it here on bandcamp and fall in love with it just like I did.  And then copy these chords and have fun!  (P.S. WordPress doesn’t seem to like extra spaces, so I can’t line up the chords correctly.  So you’ll have to figure that out on your own.)

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Sweet! The stains are gone!

vapoorizeDecent pants are expensive in Romania. I have a few pairs of blue jeans in various conditions, but I don’t have many pants I can wear for work at the school (i.e. not jeans). Two days ago, I found two of my pairs of pants got these big blue ink stains on them somehow. I quickly grabbed some soap and started scrubbing, but there was absolutely no change; the stain didn’t even smear.

Finally, I “prayed” something like, “Well, God, this sucks. I don’t have any money to buy more pants. I’ll get over it; they’re only pants, but still… You made the Israelites’ clothes last for 40 yeras, so you can make my clothes last, too. And they weren’t even trying to be faithful to you; I haven’t been perfect, but at least I’m headed in the right direction.”

And then I stuck them in a bucket of water, no soap, and thought to myself, “Maybe they just need to soak for a while… Maybe God will do something. And if not, I guess I’ll just have a couple pairs of shorts.”

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Every Bird Poops – or – God’s Power to Protect His Word

birdI remember one time beginning preaching open-air by shouting out, “There are two things that will happen to everyone.  Number one, you are going to be pooped on by a bird.  Number two, you are going to die.”  I don’t know how effective it was in drawing people to hear the gospel, but it always made me snicker.  (Seriously, who doesn’t enjoy yelling the word “poop” in public?)

While I don’t condone using birds or their digestive systems as a form of entertainment, probably the funniest video I ever saw involved bird poop.  Picture it, a group of teenagers are gathered at the beach pouring bags of potato chips onto a tray.  One teen looks at the camera, smiles, holds up a package, and almost sings, “Laxatives.”  They cover the chips liberally with the magic sprinkles.  Hardly able to contain their excited giggling, the teens carry the tray to a populated area of the beach, set it down, and then ran for cover.  Within seconds, seagulls descend upon the glorious treasure, gorging themselves on delicacies normally jealously guarded from them…  And then the white rain begins to fall…  It’s hilarious.  Completely disrespectful and rude and should never ever be repeated but outrageously funny.  (You can watch it here if you want a good laugh.)

So, bird poop.

Jesus tells a story about bird poop in Matthew 13:3-9.  Okay, so really it’s a story about seeds and soils, but there are birds in the story, and every bird poops.  Anyhow, he tells how a man is scattering seeds all over the place; some of them land on amazing soil and bring a harvest, others fall on rocky or thorny soil and don’t really grow so well, and the last of it lands on the path.  The path is the worst place because the seeds don’t even start growing at all; the birds come along and eat them all.

“Behold, the sower went out to sow; and as he sowed, some seeds fell beside the road, and the birds came and ate them up.”  (Matthew 13:3-4)

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Noah and the Flood

[In the Communion with God class, each student this year was required to research a story from the Bible and then write a paper about what he learned and what it means for us today, incorporating all we learned about studying the Bible and hearing the voice of God.  Every assignment I give our students, I also give myself.  The following is the result of my research into Noah and the flood.]

The single most devastating flood in modern history occurred in 1931 when the Huang He (Yellow) River flooded; 88,000 square kilometers of land were completely inundated, 80 million people were left homeless, and anywhere from 850,000 to 4 million lost their lives[1].  While grievous, this flood cannot compare to that which occurred during Noah’s lifetime when nearly all of human and animal life was eliminated from earth.  When we hear news of any natural disaster, we find it difficult to face, and our reaction is even stronger when we read about the flood in Genesis.  We wonder, “How could a loving God kill so many millions so casually?”, and we question the goodness of our Creator.  While our first reaction to the story is often one of disgust and bewilderment, the thrust of the narrative as told in Genesis 5:28-9:29 is not, in fact, the catastrophe.  The narrative of the flood is far more a story of redemption than of retribution, and we see this most clearly by examining the relationships within the account, in particular, the broken bond between man and nature and, by extension, the redemption of that between man and God.

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